Connect with us

Navy

Opinion: The Navy should grant me paternity leave whenever a boat mama pops out another of my kids

Published

on

By Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Sam Ojeda, USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) Deck Department

The Navy recently rolled out a policy giving all new active-duty mothers 90 days paid leave after they have a baby. The decision was made in the interest of equality, because they say it’s a lot easier for a male sailor to come back to work after he becomes a dad than it is for a female sailor to return to the ship after she delivers a kid.

Along those lines though, I really wish the Navy would start respecting the plight of us active-duty fathers, because I’ve spawned no less than three kids by three boat mamas on USS Carl Vinson, and all I’ve gotten is dick-all when it comes to paid paternity leave.

Rather, all I get is paternity tests, and the added burden of all these chicks asking for child support and blowing-up my phone wanting me to take them to medical for their pre-baby-birthing appointments.

Just where in the hell is the equality in that?

Like, seriously, the Navy needs to put its money where its mouth is when it comes to treating both male and female sailors as equals. If one of my baby mamas gets three months to bond with her kid, then why can’t I have at least a couple weeks off to go chill with my crew back in LA? Or maybe at least a four-day weekend to take in some blackjack and titty bars in Vegas?

And, before anybody asks, of course I’d want to spend some paid leave getting to know whatever the latest kid is I just fathered, but all the chicks I’ve knocked up don’t want me being any part of those babies’ lives (for whatever reason). I respect those decisions though, because letting my baby mamas be all overly-emotional and wrong without consequence is what equality is all about, see?

Now, the Navy does have an actual paternity leave policy on the books where new fathers get to take ten days off once their kid is born. But the catch with that policy is— get this— that you have to actually be married to the kid’s mom in order to cash-in on those ten days of leave.

Well, pardon me, but it’s a little hard to start-up a whole new marriage when you’re already mucking through a lengthy second divorce, like I am. And even if I were able to finalize the divorce and send Salome packing back to the Philippines, I still think my chain of command would be pretty pissed about me getting hitched to somebody in my duty section (Boat Mama One), or a gal I am directly in charge of (Baby Maker Dos), or even some chick I was tasked with keeping track of during restriction muster (I call her “The Hat Trick”).

Anyway, when it all comes down to it, I guess maybe I should just stop worrying so much about getting shafted on paternity leave. Like, the Navy’s going to do what the Navy’s is going to do, right? And if that means I get hosed while all of the women I knock up get three-months free vacation, then so be it. Equality be damned, I guess.

Besides, it’s probably best to just suck it up at this point. I’ve only got a little while left on this boat, and then I finally get to go to shore duty, where I hope I can start having a little bit more influence in helping to shape the Navy, and maybe even the Navy’s guidelines when it comes to “equality.”

Yeah, I think I’m gonna be a great recruiter.

Navy

Navy warns sailors who can’t deploy that they will be reviewed for promotion

Published

on

SAN DIEGO — Non-deployable sailors can breathe a heavy sigh of relief as Navy officials plan to implement its new “Deploy or Get Promoted” policy, sources confirmed today.

The new policy, deemed ingenious by CNN military analysts, will ensure the Navy floods its upper ranks with sailors who are injured, lazy, PT-failing, work-averse as a threat to motivate them to become deployable. Senior Navy leaders are optimistic.

“We will immediately begin processing promotions for sailors who have been non-deployable for 24 months or more,” said Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John M. Richardson. “Even those sailors who have deliberately missed medical and immunization appointments to avoid deployment will be able to stay behind and ‘run shit.’ I mean, we issued tons of medical waivers when these people enlisted. It’s time we cash in that check and grow them into the future we need.”

The new policy seeks to promote lazy, wounded broke-dicks, as well as worthless skaters, and it has garnered support in the senior enlisted ranks.

“Everyone who doesn’t want to be here, doesn’t want to contribute, and doesn’t believe in our mission should be given higher levels of responsibly. It’s the only way they can grow into the leaders we need them to be,” said Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russ Smith.

“I always like to say, ‘The early bird gets the shitter-scrubbing duty because they are motivated,’” said Senior Chief Petty Officer John Gillespie. “But the sailors who arrive late from phony medical appointments? They have management written all over them! I’m serious. Don’t test me. We’ll do it. Get in line and make yourself deployable, or else!” he said while pointing to his rank insignia with a smirk.

Roughly 11 percent of members in the U.S. military — approximately 286,000 — meet this criteria for immediate promotion into roles that are expected to swell with incompetence.

After receiving their forced promotion, the sailors will be expected to attend leadership training completely against their will, learn how to delegate all of their assigned tasks, and learn the valuable art of shirking responsibility and hiding behind sham ignorance in order to avoid putting forth any effort at all.

However, not all sailors are getting on-board with this new policy.

“This can never work,” said Petty Officer 3rd Class Mike Jones while hiding behind some cabinets to avoid being selected for a cleaning party. “They are already trying to deluge leadership ranks with ineffective, worthless leaders who show ‘potential.’ It’s a program called Annapolis. Ever heard of it?”

There is at least one exception to the policy: if you are non-deployable due to being dead, then you can rest in peace knowing that you will not be posthumously promoted against your will.

Officials also confirmed that their next policy initiative will focus on raising low morale, something the Navy has been mysteriously plagued with for nearly fifty years.

Continue Reading

Marine Corps

Navy announces newest occupational specialty: ‘meat gazer’

Published

on

WASHINGTON  — The Navy announced today the creation of a new career track to help with its large urinalysis test backlog: meat gazer.

The new Navy occupational specialty will require sailors to keep an eye on the wieners of service members as they urinate into collection cups during drug tests.

“Meat gazing was historically a low-level collateral duty for go getters who volunteered to impress commanders, weirdos who enjoy checking out other dudes’ packages, or simple run-of-the-mill perverts. Now, it’s a full-time job,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer.

The meat gazer rating is the result of a petition that went viral and gained the attention of Navy leaders.

The Marines started the petition.org effort as a joke, but it quickly garnered service-wide exposure. Roughly 245,000 sailors signed the petition within days, which equates to nearly three-quarters of the Navy begging and yearning to stare at rods for a living.

“In addition to the petition, we also noted that a large number of sailors already excelled in staring at the genitalia of other male sailors in the restroom,” said Capt. Richard D. Head, who is spearheading the new initiative. “It really made sense to build a satisfying career track for these hog worshipers.”

While sailors from across the Navy have been submitting rate-change request packets in record numbers, most of the new meat gazers are expected to come from the ranks of the Navy’s master at arms rating, which already has a high number of habitual meat gazers.

Advancement exams for the new specialty will cover topics such as advising sailors on how to handle their beef during testing, keeping urine containers uncontaminated, and requiring sailors to stand far enough away from urinals to allow meat gazers the perfect view to see urine leave the penis.

“Sometimes we are staring more intently and concentrating harder than the person trying to push urine through their meat sticks,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Jack M. Hoff. “But the whole experience is satisfying to everyone involved. I’m glad the Navy has heard our voices and is allowing meat gazers to exist. I’m beyond excited.”

Sailors hoping to obtain a slot as a meat gazer have been spending their free time hanging out in as many locker rooms as possible, practicing their trade, and honing their skills, according to sources.

Continue Reading

Navy

Navy SEAL: The best way to tell people you’re a Navy SEAL is to tell them

Published

on

By

NORFOLK, Va. — Navy SEALs, one of America’s most iconic special operations forces, are renowned for their expertise, prowess, and the shroud of secrecy surrounding their operations. However, the life of a Navy Special Warfare operator can also be one of the most rewarding paths in the military service, given the right combination of experience, publishers, and celebrity connections, according to a new book by former SEAL Joe McQueeney.

“Being a SEAL isn’t all guts-and-glory, or five-mile swims before dawn,” McQueeney said. “There’s also networking with publicists, prime-time appearances on cable news channels, and telling complete strangers what you do for a living.”

According to McQueeney, it was difficult for him to learn to interject his SEAL service into unrelated conversations, but he overcame his initial hesitance during a PTA meeting at his daughter’s elementary school.

“The principal had asked if the parents had any concerns, and I remember standing up to make a comment on the school lunches. I said, ‘I think, as a Navy SEAL, the lunches here aren’t very nutritious,’ and that if I had to eat that food every day, I would never have gotten in camera-ready shape to star in the Hollywood blockbuster ‘Act of Valor,’” he said.

“From then on, it got a little easier to bring up my covert ops experience to total strangers, whether I’m buying groceries, chatting up girls at the gym, or even asking police officers to give me their service weapon on Instagram.”

McQueeney’s interview was cut short when the barista at Starbucks announced that she had a venti no-whip soy mocha frap for a “Quiet Professional.”

Continue Reading

Navy

Another round of high-ranking elves implicated in Fat Blitzen scandal

Published

on

NORTH POLE – Another round of high-ranking elves face allegations of corruption through their association with the known convict Fat Blitzen, sources close to Santa confirmed today.

“This is ho-ho-horrible,” Santa said. “This web of corruption and kickbacks is so pervasive that if I got rid of all the elves who were involved, I’d be left with the two nitwits in the Egg Nog room, Mrs. Claus, and an empty pair of jingle shoes.”

Blitzen, the leader of the network, had been bribing elves to redirect Santa to homes where he controlled critical holiday services such as cookie icing, fudge packing, and caroling.

The elves are charged with accepting inflated pricing on magical glitter flying reindeer feed, milk and cookies for Santa, and inflated rooftop landing fees. With the help of the elves, Blitzen was even able to re-engineer parts of the sleigh so it would only fit down Blitzen-approved chimneys.

Santa has shown leniency towards the elves, downgrading charges of caroluption. Buddy, the last elf to see UCMJ for his actions, was sentenced to pay wreathstatution.

Blitzen is facing up to 8 years on the naughty list in the U.S. and possible candy caning in Singapore.

Continue Reading

Marine Corps

Meet the woman who got a kidney transplant from an infantryman and woke up craving Monster and Skoal

Published

on

CARMEL, Ind. – Third grade teacher Kasie Spyker woke up after a long-awaited kidney transplant dying for a cold Monster and fresh can of Skoal after receiving an organ from an infantryman, sources at Methodist Hospital confirmed today.

Spyker, who had been suffering from lupus and on a strict diet of fresh foods her entire life, had never tried any of Monster’s products before the life-saving surgery.

“I’d heard from other patients in the transplant ward that they felt different after the transplant.” Said Spyker. “For David, he got a lung transplant from a marathoner and suddenly wanted to go running. I got a kidney from an infantryman, and suddenly wanted to pack a fat lip.”

Spyker’s friends and family had raised over $20,000 to help pay for the transplant surgery and recovery. They were thrilled to learn that she’d be getting a kidney from a young infantryman at the peak of physical fitness after he died suddenly in a freak motorcycle airbrushing accident. They now hope to raise money for the Dodge Charger payments the soldier left behind.

“I feel like a new woman,” said Spyker, drawing out a fresh new tattoo to commemorate the transplant. “I’m so thankful for this new lease on life. I can’t wait until I’m out of this hospital gown and can go buy some new affliction t-shirts and axe body spray.”

Continue Reading

Air Force

Charles ‘Wide Neck’ McDowell leads USO Tour request voting

Published

on

By

ARLINGTON, Va. — After weeks of neck-and-neck voting, Charles “Wide Neck” McDowell has pulled ahead of adult film actress Riley Reid as the most requested USO star for an upcoming international tour, sources confirmed today.

Service members from throughout the military placed more than 645,000 votes for McDowell and 320,000 for Reid this month following McDowell’s fame after his mugshot went viral.

“This is the kind of guy that everyone has necks-level love for,” commented Andrew Green, a specialist with the 82nd Airborne Division. “Soldiers across the world are coming together and neckworking to bring this god to bless our troops and potentially end racism.”

Though the voting does play a large role for the USO in selecting and funding the star, many more factors come into play before booking can actually begin.

“We sent someone down to Charles’ neck of the woods in Florida where he is currently training for his MMA debut. But despite his schedule he seemed interested, and we will discuss more necks week,” said Robert Hales, booking agent for the USO.

Hales did show some hesitation about bringing McDowell along for the European and Middle East tour starting next March.

“I want to give the troops what they have requested, but they’re in for a shock as soon as they see his neck is normal and his head is just tiny,” he said.

Reid volunteered to go on the tour for free if McDowell decided to attend.

“No lie, wide neck, a go pro, and me could trade his 15 min of fame to 15 min of bliss,” she tweeted.

Florida authorities have also voiced their full-throated support for McDowell to give back to the troops, offering to count it as community service and allowing him to travel internationally. Currently out on bail, McDowell has been capitalizing on his fame by appearing on MTV’s show “Necks,” singing in a feature of Ariana Grande’s “Thank You, Necks” hit song, and swallowing watermelons whole for five dollars in Orlando. Hopes are Ol’ Saint Neck could travel by Christmas.

Continue Reading

Army

Navy pranks Army with 17 years of sustained land-based combat just before Army-Navy game

Published

on

PHILADELPHIA — Midshipmen carried on a long tradition of friendly hijinks just before their collegiate rivalry game by pranking Army with 17 years of sustained land-based combat to just “get in their heads” before the big game today.

“We thought, what if these guys who aren’t old enough to drink figure out they’ve dedicated their futures to sprawling forever wars?” said Midshipman Michael Nelson, the senior leading the prank. “Who could mimic the tactics of war for screaming football fans? Once they hold the knowledge that blood and sacrifice will never accomplish the political ends we call victory, they’ll never be able to focus on the game. Navy Wins! Dude, we pwned them good.”

“Plus, after that thing with the Air Force Falcon, we didn’t want to touch animals.” added Nelson.

Nelson got the idea for the hilarious prank while making an Army-Navy rivalry video in his room in Bancroft Hall.

“We ran out of gay jokes, and I was thinking about getting stationed in Oahu with my hot first wife while West Point’s players were going to be leading pointless presence patrols on a route called futility. That’s when I realized that it was the perfect prank!” he said.

Darnell Woolfolk, West Point’s starting running back, fell victim to the hijinks late Friday night when his roommate’s sort of hot cousin called. Little did he know she was working for Team Navy and would subtly let him know that win or lose, he could look forward to multiple rotations in the same wars his father fought.

“I was really pumped up for the game.” Said Woolfolk. “I was listening to Future and thinking about crushing Navy. Then I slowly started thinking about the sacrifices I was making for an American populace that grows further disconnected and disinterested in what we say we’re fighting for. I immediately snuck into Washington Hall to eat spaghetti on ice cream from our special athlete refrigerators.”

“It doesn’t matter,” Woolfolk added, staring into an existential void of multiple deployments, football-induced brain injuries, and strawberry ice cream. “None of it matters anymore.”

As a battered copy of the ‘The Quaker Guide to Gaining Conscientious Objector Status” circulated around the student section of Lincoln Financial Field, West Point’s Corps of Cadets fought back in the healthy spirit of inter-service rivalry by reminding the Brigade of Midshipmen that soon, they’d be wearing an Army uniform and calling themselves “sand sailors” no matter how many aircraft carriers Congress to gave them.

The practical joke strategy worked so well that Navy plans to get in conference rival Tulane’s head by reminding them about the crippling interest rate on student loan debt and the chances of finding job after graduation.

Continue Reading

Navy

Zip-tied Somali pirates bet on how many SEAL memoirs they’ll be in

Published

on

MOGADISHU, Somalia — Four zip-tied Somali nationals placed bets on how many Navy SEAL memoirs they would be featured in, according to three SEAL memoirs already published since yesterday’s stand-off.

“Three shots in the dark, and the sacred rite of warfare had ended,” read one description of the mission in 2nd Class Petty Officer Jim MacDonald’s memoir “After Action: Hindsight through NVGs.” “It was a scene that has played out countless times in history: a little boat rocking in the moonlight that was like the gaze of Valhalla, a band of pirates arguing heatedly about how many airport bookstores would carry ghostwritten accounts of their capture.”

Another account of the event appeared in 2nd Class Petty Officer Joe Silvo’s “No Fear: Lessons on Hard Core Leadership for Market Uncertainty.”

“Hard core leaders eat accountability for breakfast,” read the opening paragraph of Chapter One: Hard Core Competencies. “But it can also make even the hardest core leaders feel vulnerable. For instance, when a band of pirates ridiculed me to tears as shameless self-promoter who would disgrace the Navy by cashing in on the prestige of the SEAL name to sell schlock to corporate executives, I almost didn’t ask them for a quote for this book.”

The betting took place after SEAL snipers killed three armed pirates who had taken an American oil tanker crew hostage in a small boat in the Gulf of Aden. Four Somalis were left to contemplate their fates as the SEALs moved in.

“As the bow of our boat parted the mist, we heard groans of agony rising from the pirate’s dinghy,” recalled Chief Petty Officer Ruben Martinez in “Crunch Time: Navy SEAL Secrets to Rock-Hard Abs.”

“Prepared for an ugly scene, we were surprised to find the pirates alert and unharmed, resigned to the fact that they would be reduced to two-dimensional caricatures in the many, many books that would be written about this non-event.”

The captives were driven to piracy by social and environmental forces that were out of their control, which should be considered when depicting them in film or literature, according to screenwriter Katherine Heller who designed the memoir-writing phase of SEAL Qualification Training.

“Picture a community devastated by war, disease, starvation, and neglect, and drop it right at the edge of the sea,” she told a class Wednesday, underlining “Raise The Stakes” on a chalkboard. “It’s the brutal friction between these two realities — the barbarity of man, the endlessness mystery of the raging ocean — that wrought these charact … I mean, survivors, and drove them to confrontation with the most hardened killers in the US military.”

“This is ‘Lone Survivor‘-level sales for anyone who does it right,” she added.

As Duffel Blog went to press, the four as-yet unnamed men were en route to a holding facility in Norfolk, Virginia, where they will face a grueling schedule of interviews by the hundreds of SEALs currently writing memoirs.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending