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US quietly builds helipad on roof of embassy in Afghanistan

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Photo of average embassy in Kabul, Yemen or Saigon. (Source: State Dept.)

KABUL — The U.S. military has quietly built a helipad on the roof of its embassy in Afghanistan, sources confirmed today.

The pad was recently completed with no announcement made by either the State Department or the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, which is scheduled to be the future tenant of the embassy in Nov. 2019 (It wasn’t clear whether the Emirate would occupy two or every single floor of the building, sources said).

Black & Tuber, an industrial services corporation headquartered in Islamabad, won the contract for the project, which required a helicopter landing pad that could handle the weight of hundreds of helicopter landings and thousands of terrified refugees. It completed in record time compared to others recently built in Yemen, South Sudan and Ukraine, officials said.

“They worked on it 24/7,” said one Marine Security Guard. “We had to escort the contractors around the clock, plus guard the suicide bomb vests we made them take off before each shift.”

When asked about the helipad by Duffel Blog, Ambassador John Bass claimed that it was a regularly-scheduled project.

“I wouldn’t read too much into that,” Bass said while taking a break from packing his suitcase. “We’ll continue to muddle along for decades into the future.”

The ambassador also noted improvements to the embassy such as a helipad were part of a long-running upgrade program. “For example,” he said, “we’ve recently purchased a pallet of ‘go bags’ for the staff to use on vacation, plus 20 stair climber workout machines. So there’s nothing to speak to here.”

The U.S. commitment to the troubled country’s internal security has been widely discussed among statesmen, defense leaders, and lance corporals masturbating in guard shacks long before incoming Central Command leader Lt. Gen. Kenneth McKenzie, Jr., told Congress that he doesn’t know how long it’s going to take until Afghan forces can defend their own country.

“McKenzie is basically saying that we’ll be there until the first Pakistan-supplied T-80 tank smashes through the front gate,” said Henry Kissinger, a former Secretary of State and 1980s-era disco party animal. “After that, it’s hells bells for the roof.”

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